Post Medical Job

Do you have a permanent (full-time or part-time) opening for a high-quality medical specialist? Click Here to post More »

Post Your Resume Here

Are you a healthcare professional working long 12 -14 hour days, too many weekends and holidays, or traveling too far from home? Are you not home for dinner usually or not able to spend enough quality time with your family More »

About US

NSI Healthcare Recruiters is one of the most trusted and reliable recruitment and placement services available to medical professionals in the USA. NSI has been in business for over 29 years and has assisted many healthcare providers in locating and hiring qualified medical professionals. More »

Contact Us

Candidates: Because our posted healthcare jobs are filled quickly we ask that you contact us for the latest updates. Employers: Please post your job here for affordable placement service. More »

nsihealthcarerecruiter

We at nsihealthcarerecruiter.com pride ourselves on the highest quality, personalized-service that medical facilities and medical job applicants alike have come to expect from us. pride ourselves on the highest quality, personalized-service that medical facilities and medical job applicants alike have come to expect from us. More »

 

Guest Commentary: Washington needs to stabalize the markets to move forward on healthcare

After a season of healthcare policy fits and starts, now is the time for Washington to take a collective deep breath and assess what we learned and how we as a nation can do better.
Modern Healthcare Breaking News

6 tips for writing a stellar hospital blog

While most organizations have made the foray into social media, the decision to launch a blog comes with many questions.

How do you leverage existing content and publications? Should you have regular contributors? Who will read it?

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute launched our blog, Insight in fall 2011, after a long and thorough planning process. It provides an opportunity to share the patient stories that inspire us, and the research discoveries that give us hope. Here are a few of the lessons we learned along the way:

1. Be strategic

Before you start designing the blog’s layout and assigning stories, think first about what you would like to achieve. Do you want to increase awareness of your organization’s expertise in a particular area? Who do you hope to reach? All content decisions should be tied directly to your objective and key audiences, so take the time to answers these questions first.

2. Show, don’t tell

While blogs provide an opportunity to highlight your organization’s brand image, it’s important to avoid being overly self-promotional. Provide concrete examples and let the reader decide for themselves. Marketing jargon like “world-class” and “patient-centered approach” are red flags that will turn readers away.

3. Analyze and reflect

Tracking click-throughs, comments, and sharing will make it easy to spot readership trends. Use this information to help guide future content decisions or test out a new approach.

[FREE DOWNLOAD: Digital Marketing Musts for Health Care Communicators]

4. Plan ahead, but be flexible

Posting regular content will give readers a reason to come back. But remember not to be so rigid that you don’t have room for late-breaking opportunities. Providing expert commentary on major news stories can help increase your company’s visibility, and make your blog more relevant.

5. Manage expectations

Even with the best planning and PR, your blog is probably not going to be an overnight sensation. “If you build it, they will come” doesn’t always hold true online. It will take time to grow an audience, and not every post will attract huge readership and hundreds of comments. Make sure your stakeholders are aware of this, and keep them up to date with marketing initiatives so they have an ongoing sense of what success looks like.

6. Market your blog

If people aren’t aware of your blog, they can’t read it. Start with an internal campaign first—your organization’s employees can be your best ambassadors. Don’t forget to post news of the official launch on your website, reach out to your local newspaper, and tease new stories on Facebook and Twitter each week.

This post originally appeared on “Insight,” a blog by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. 

Previously published material.

HealthCareCommunication.com

Trump Denies Telling Widow Of Slain Soldier That He ‘Knew What He Signed Up For’ | TIME

Source: www.youtube.com – Wednesday, October 18, 2017

All Related

Top Videos on RSS Feeds

How health care organizations prove ROI through digital marketing

In the past, health care organizations relied on doctor referrals and inefficient mass advertising to reach potential patients.

Today, it’s possible to tie the procedures booked and the income earned to specific campaigns. You can glean digital data from apps and the internet—and even from billboards and print ads.

A new tip sheet from Ragan Communications and Blackbaud, “Digital Marketing Musts for Health Care Communicators ,” offers ways to track your return on investment. The free download offers tips and tactics for making the most of your marketing campaigns.

Modernize your marketing, and you’ll no longer have to speculate which campaign or communications effort brought in a patient. Learn from experts at Mayo Clinic, Riverside Healthcare and others how to capture data and tie your marketing efforts to the bottom line. There are ways to serve the needs of your patients—and your marketing requirements—and do it all ethically.

“Health care is one of those unique industries where there’s a lot of data,” says Adam Brase, chair of marketing at Mayo Clinic, “but we have to be careful how we collect data, and how we use that data to better serve our customers and our patients.”

Multifarious methods

The tip sheet covers a range of ways you can find out where you are getting the most for your marketing dollars.

Hospitals have something valuable to offer—medical expertise. If you provide useful information, your grateful audience will provide data in exchange. Find out how to do this.

“You have to give them something of value, so they will give you their email address,” Ujjainwalla says.

By next year, two-thirds of interactions with health care facilities will occur by mobile devices. That makes apps an increasingly important means of reaching and engaging with potential patients.

Mayo Clinic’s main application provides strong engagement with offerings that range from an appointments function to useful content. Learn what kind of content keeps people coming back time and time again.

Many organizations struggle with proving the ROI for print and billboard advertising. There’s a simple way to gather that data, enabling you to trace incoming patients right down to the street corner where they first saw your ad.

Brand journalism can play a part. Riverside Healthcare in Kankakee, Illinois, launched a stroke campaign that included blog posts, videos with specialists, Facebook posts and other elements, says Judy Pretto, manager of marketing and communications.

“This is about planting the seed for when the need is there,” Pretto says.

From cultivating advocates to customer relationship management systems, from Google AdWords to harnessing the data of website searches, find out how other health care organizations are making the leap to smart marketing.

Don’t be left behind. Download your free guide now.

HealthCareCommunication.com

How to launch a successful internal communications app

Once upon a time, organizations had to rely on emails or intranets to reach far-flung employees.

For those who worked in non-office environments such as hospitals, retail stores and factory assembly lines, it was tough luck.

Nowadays, with a smartphone in practically every employee’s pocket or purse, there’s a better way: internal communications apps.

A free guide from Ragan Communications and Sitrion reveals getting an app up and running, doing it right. The free download, “How to launch an internal communications app,” offers tips from the communications leaders SAS, Fortune Brands, HealthSouth and ConocoPhillips.

Don’t blow your big opportunity to communicate directly with all your staff. There are steps you can take to ensure your app is successful.

“The ability to reach an employee in a manufacturing setting at the same time that you reach somebody sitting in the office, for a U.S. manufacturing company like ours, that’s pretty cutting-edge,” says Elizabeth Castro, senior director of corporate communications at Fortune Brands, a home and security products company.

The download offers guidance for those who are thinking about creating an employee app but are unsure where to start. You’ll find out:

  • What SAS did to determine which features would get its employees to download and use its app.
  • “We had a lot of great direct feedback from employees on that, which was helpful in determining where to start,” says Becky Graebe, internal communications director for SAS, the North Carolina business analytics company.
  • What HealthSouth learned from personas and focus groups.
  • How to make the case to executives and sell them on the benefits of the app. Hint: They like to hear about how it will improve their own communications. Learn what your secret weapon is in selling your app to decision-makers.
  • How to make an app that’s useful—and what “one-stop shopping will do for your employees.”
  • Why the launch matters. Castro advises organizations to make sure it’s done properly. “Don’t rush to it,” she says.
  • How to follow up. You can’t just push the app, then sit back and relax. Once it’s out there, you must ensure its success and weigh future enhancements.
  • Why content matters. One tool, more than any other, will help you keep content fresh to entice employees to use the app on a regular basis, experts advise.
  • The one essential question you should ask when creating and sustaining your app.

Just about every organization can launch an app that will move it beyond older, inefficient forms of internal communications. Learn how to make yours a success.

Download the guide today.

HealthCareCommunication.com

5 ways to measure better at your hospital

Building a measurement strategy for your marketing/communication efforts isn’t easy. Particularly when you’re starting anew (or dramatically rebuilding what you’ve already done). Someone starting down this path usually begins the process with a look of confusion.

Measuring what you’re doing is daunting. Particularly with all the extra scrutiny we’re facing: tightening budgets, not enough time, an over-arching pressure to show ROI and proving what we’re doing is actually working.

There are so many things you can/should be measuring. There is so much to measure (and many more that you wish you could measure, but you don’t have access to the right data). At times it seems overwhelming.

Consider that old joke: How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.

Here are a few tips on how to begin digesting that enormous pachyderm of measurement:

Bite #1: Realize you can’t measure the whole thing—pick one thing to start.
Pick a single marketing or communication activity that you are doing that is important to you—or more importantly, to your business goals. The best way to learn good measurement discipline is by doing it well one time, and then applying that knowledge over others in a broader way.

Bite #2: Pick something you have control over.
Some efforts involve multiple people or teams—either within your organization or outside. When you are getting started, it’s best to pick something you manage directly. Not only will it guarantee you’ll have access to all of the metrics, but you can also adjust and modify the activity if you need to improve.

RELATED: Join us in San Francisco for The Role of Communications in Creating Best Places to Work.

Bite #3: Realize that you can’t measure alone—seek help.
Be realistic about what you can and cannot measure. Sometimes you don’t have access to all the data to measure. Find people within your organization that can help you measure. Become friends with them, share with them your desire to measure and then ask for their help. (Bonus bite: if one of these people are in finance, they love to measure!)

Bite #4: Pick the right metrics.
There are hundreds of things you can measure. Maybe more. When you start measuring your efforts, take some time to focus on those metrics that make sense. Align them with your business goals. Establish Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and spend your time measuring just those. Remember: just because you can measure it, doesn’t mean it’s the right thing to measure. Be selective.

Bite #5: Review, adjust, rinse and repeat.
Once you pulled together your first report, sit down with your findings. Review them in depth to determine if you can improve the way you measure. Share your report with others and ask for their input. Always seek ways to improve—good measurement discipline involves constant review. And then use what you just learned to find another thing you can start to measure.

Taking it one little piece at a time allows you to begin building the internal discipline you need to measure the effectiveness of your marketing/communication efforts.

And it will help prevent you from biting off more than you can chew.

You can read more from Chris Boyer here.

Previously published material.

HealthCareCommunication.com

Why Trump is Wrong About Trade

Source: www.michigancapitolconfidential.com – Sunday, October 15, 2017
There aren’t many policies that get near unanimous support from economists, but free trade is one of them. Despite this, a central theme of the 2016 presidential campaign, heard from both political parties, was that free trade was somehow harmful to the United States and corrective action was needed. Mark Perry, an economics professor at the University of Michigan-Flint and scholar with the American Enterprise Institute, makes the case for why President Trump’s assessment of free trade is misguided. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv8hEddC4rI

All Related

Top Videos on RSS Feeds

30 jobs in the PR and marketing world

Where is the best place to get pizza in Chicago? (I’ll keep my opinion to myself—for the purpose of this post, at least.)

What gym has the best trainers to help me get a jump start on my New Year’s resolution?

Which spa will provide the most relaxing massage?

These are just a few questions that people ask every day.

Two former PayPal employees recognized this and believed that consumers should be able to consult one another to find out which organizations offer outstanding products and services and which ones are lagging.

In 2004, Jeremy Stoppelman and Russel Simmons raised $ 1 million to start a company that could help users answer and get answers to their purchasing questions.

Now, millions turn to Yelp for consumer reviews on everything from making reservations at a restaurant, booking an appointment with a doctor or calling a plumber to fix a leaky faucet.

Do you think your résumé would receive a five-star review? Yelp is looking for an associate manager for consumer marketing in San Francisco.

Interested candidates should have a strong background in email marketing and excel in project management.

Yelp describes its ideal candidate:

The ideal candidate brings a data driven approach to decision making, a keen creative eye, and has experience in email marketing. A successful candidate has experience supporting world-class marketing programs and is comfortable leveraging marketing automation technologies. They are relentlessly process driven, a stellar communicator, and detail-oriented.

Just starting your career? The company is also seeking a marketing intern in Miami.

[RELATED: Join us for the Social Media #Mashup at Disneyland.]

Not the job for you? See what else we have in our weekly professional pickings:

Media manager—Chanel (New York)

Marketing manager—Snap Inc. (Australia)

Public relations coordinator—Belkin (California)

Coordinator, marketing—Sony Music Entertainment (New York)

Assistant marketing manager—Oxford University Press (North Carolina)

Creative editor—Instagram (United Kingdom)

Director of email marketing, North America—Groupon (Illinois)

Public relations manager—Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau(Tennessee)

Marketing manager—Facebook (California)

Marketing manager, health enterprise—University of Texas at Austin(Texas)

Corporate public relations lead—Target (Minnesota)

Public relations specialist—Hudson’s Bay Co. (Canada)

Marketing and public relations specialist—Denver Health Medical Center(Colorado)

Senior director of community relations and marketing—Oregon StateUniversity – Cascades (Oregon)

Marketing communications manager—General Electric Co. (Virginia)

Junior account executive—Litzky Public Relations (New Jersey)

Marketing and development coordinator—Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center(Kansas)

Public relations coordinator—The Ohio State University (Ohio)

PR manager, Amazon Books—Amazon (Washington)

Director of communications—Mashable (New York)

Marketing director—Chick-fil-A

Market associate—Expedia (Canada)

Senior director of public relations—Utah Valley University (Utah)

Marketing manager—Pet Smart (Arizona)

Digital communications manager—Michigan State University (Michigan)

Marketing manager—Community Health Network (Indiana)

Manager of digital marketing and analytics—YMCA (New Jersey)

Marketing manager—Embassy Suites (Florida)

If you have a position you’d like to see highlighted in PR Daily’s weekly jobs post, please email me a link to the listing.

(Image via)

HealthCareCommunication.com

6 ways Sharp HealthCare employees stay fit

Sharp HealthCare’s comprehensive employee wellness program, Sharp Best Health, encourages team members to incorporate healthy habits into their lifestyles by helping them reach personal health goals. It offers a variety of resources—from healthy recipes to fitness classes to personalized health coaching—all designed to help employees live their healthiest lives.

One of the most important components in the success of this system-wide program is having strong executive support. Here are six ways your organization can keep team members healthy at work.

Supportive policies
Sharp Best Health’s policies encourage a healthy workplace by making it easier to enjoy healthy lifestyle behaviors in the workplace. Examples of workplace policies that support wellness at Sharp include a smoke-free workplace, support of flexible work schedules to allow participation in wellness activities, requiring food vendors to offer healthier selections in cafeterias as well as vending machines, and support of walking meetings and regular stretching breaks.

Wellness initiatives and opportunities
Wellness initiatives at a work site are convenient, cost-effective, fun and help employees stay committed to their wellness goals while at work. Sharp Best Health offers employees numerous fitness and nutrition-related initiatives across its seven hospitals and two medical groups. Examples of such initiatives include: ongoing fitness classes such as yoga, Zumba and boot camps; on-site massage; walking/step challenges; Stairwell Days; Meatless Mondays in cafeterias; and a Community Support Agriculture (CSA)-type produce box that is delivered to employees twice a month.

Staying connected
A significant part of any workplace wellness program is employee communication and education and social media is a beneficial way to expand those efforts. Sharp Best Health has a very active online life, with its presence on a blog hosted on Sharp HealthCare’s intranet, multiple café and healthy vending machine navigation videos, a Fitbit community, a personal health portal and a Pinterest board.

RELATED: Develop a workplace culture that attracts and supports employees of all ages and backgrounds

Involvement with the community
Sharp HealthCare actively supports multiple community health events. Its fundraising and recruitment efforts usually make Sharp HealthCare one of the top fundraisers for the American Heart Association Heart Walk, the Tour de Cure and its local YMCA’s Spin-a-thon cycle marathon.

Free employee health screenings
Sharp offers free confidential health screenings to all team members to help them identify any current or future health problems. Over the span of a few months, close to 11,500 employees were screened in the following indicators: blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index, random blood sugar and tobacco use.

Free health coaching to all employees
Sharp Best Health offers personalized health coaching in five different areas: healthy weight management, smoking cessation, healthy eating, physical activity and stress management. Health coaching is a collaborative and confidential wellness program delivered by Sharp Health Plan for all Sharp Healthcare employees. Through the coaching program, participants work one-on-one—over the phone—with a dedicated coach who provides individualized support and guidance in developing the knowledge, skills and motivation necessary to reach their best health.

Previously published material.

HealthCareCommunication.com

Imagine ‘Groundhog Day’ with murder and a flawed victim who must save herself in ‘Happy Death Day’

“Happy Death Day,” the story of a woman caught in an endless loop of her own death, uses familiar elements from the horror genre — and the classic movie “Groundhog Day” — to deliver its scares with wit and a wink.

It starts with Tree Gelbman (Jessica Rothe), a sorority sister in desperate need…


latimes.com – Los Angeles Times